(Contemporary) Christian Culture

While I normally enjoy articles I read on The Resurgence, this one has me shaking my head.

This article embodies everything I despise about contemporary Christian culture. It’s the ever so consistent, never-willing-to-die mentality of “Let’s steal from the world and put a Christian sounding veneer on it” that makes me not want to admit I’m a Christian in certain crowds. Also, it never pointed out why the world is wrong about marriage. The author jumps to conclusions with no attempts at laying out evidence.

Spending large chunks of time away from your husband, flirting with other men, and seeking selfish pleasures are invitations to disaster.

While this is true, the author makes no attempts at laying out why it’s true. There is nothing here to wrestle with. This article fails to get into the nitty-gritty of life.

One would think that Christians would produce the best counsel, the best songs, the best academics, the best works of art and be the best athletes. Sadly, we so often strive just to “be different” from the world. No wonder so many children of church goers end up bitter against Christianity.

6 thoughts on “(Contemporary) Christian Culture

  1. eh; its not an accademic article- its just a rebuttal to a “Vanity Fair” article, which aint exactly Westminster Seminary in terms of its brilliance……. :>P As far as it went, it was OK IMO.

  2. What I fail to understand is why any mature Christian would consider giving advice, in a public venue, in this sort of manner? It does come across as rather shallow.

  3. I more or less gave up on the Resurgence after Justin Holcomb (it’s director) has decided to repeatedly utter claims like no more than 2% of false rape claims are valid. (There’s been a lot of studies done – summarized here – which have almost always suggested rates higher than 2%, and often higher than rates for other crimes). In this and a number of other areas he seems to be cherry-picking results to make the problem look worse. Beyond perhaps netting a few extra sales of his book, serious negative consequences can result from perpetuating claims of this nature.

    (I’ve contacted him about this several times – he has refused to change his figures and refused to supply specific references to them [eventually he gave me a list of about 30 publications, but the problem is that none of them actually dealt with the issue]).

  4. Let’s try this again with a fixed link (please delete previous comment):

    I more or less gave up on the Resurgence after Justin Holcomb (it’s director) has decided to repeatedly utter claims like that no more than 2% of false rape claims are valid. (There’s been a lot of studies done – summarized here – which have almost always suggested rates higher than 2%, and often higher than rates for other crimes). In this and a number of other areas he seems to be cherry-picking results to make the problem look worse. Beyond perhaps netting a few extra sales of his book, serious negative consequences can result from perpetuating claims of this nature.
    (I’ve contacted him about this several times – he has refused to change his figures and refused to supply specific references to them [eventually he gave me a list of about 30 publications, but the problem is that none of them actually dealt with the issue]).

  5. Sorry… looks like my words were poorly phrased. To quote the phrasing of this on the Crossway blog: “the number of falsely reported sexual assaults is less than that of other crimes—2%.” i.e. the claim is that at least 98% are telling the truth not that 98% were false.

    A figure somewhere in the 91-92% range is probably more reasonable [although not totally conclusive] based on the data, a rate somewhat higher than for false-reporting of other crimes. (e.g. the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports are fairly typical in deeming 8-9% unfounded… the link to the journal article I mentioned provides the sources that the Crossway blog doesn’t [despite those sources being requested by a commenter]). i.e. it’s bad data. That doesn’t mean that the fraction of truthful claims isn’t high – just that he’s exaggerating his claims.

    Note that this just includes rape claims… not the related issue of non-reported rapes – IIRC the DOJ’s Bureau of Justice Statistics assumes this crime to go about 90% non-reported [and even then comes up with a much lower rate than’s Holcomb’s]). I can totally see this one as a difficult issue on all sides – both on the part of those raped and those accused of rape – there’s often not a lot of evidence one way or the other in this incidents.

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